PICNIC-Podcast by Ipswitch

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Why IT Professionals Need to Learn to Code

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For our first PICNIC episode of 2018, we welcome our friend and returning guest Adam Bertam, Chief Automator at Adam the Automator LLC.

Adam Bertram is an automation engineer, blogger, independent consultant, freelance writer, author, trainer, and presenter. Adam focuses on DevOps, system management, and automation technologies as well as various cloud platforms. He is a Microsoft Cloud and Datacenter Management MVP, a passionate learner and efficiency nerd that enjoys teaching others a better way to leverage automation. You can find Adam at his adamtheautomator.com blog, LinkedIn or on Twitter at @adbertram.

Ever since the introduction of the Infrastructure in the Cloud and DevOps over the past decade, IT professionals have seen a giant pivot in the skill sets that are needed to get the job done. Hardware maintenance and repair is only small part of the job now. Tape backups are being replaced by cloud backups, servers are becoming virtualized, and system administration is being automated to save time. With all that said, that means coding and scripting is coming to the forefront of everything that IT people do. Today we are going to talk about the changes going on in the IT world and if you are an IT professional, why you need to learn how to code.

Questions we will cover with Adam today:

  • As a PowerShell guru, you’ve certainly have been ahead of the game when it comes to scripting and automation in IT. I bet we can’t say the same for many other small and medium businesses. Why do IT pros need to learn to code?
  • So, we are trending in the direction that many of IT’s tasks need to be automated. Do you think there is a shortage of IT pros who have coding skills in the workforce because of this? How does one get started if they have been focused on hardware their whole career, for instance?
  • What if you hate coding and scripting and you work in IT? Is it time to start looking for another career path?
  • I know you are biased towards PowerShell., but if I’m an IT person looking to learn a new language, which language would you recommend and why?
  • Coding has always been tied to being a programmer. Are you saying that all IT pros need to be programmers? That seems like it would be a big leap for a lot of people in this line of work.
  • Could you share some resources that have helped you keep your scripting skills fresh? Any recommendations for the uninitiated?

Infrastructure as Code

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In Today’s PICNIC episode, we welcome our friend and frequent guest Adam Bertam, Chief Automator at Adam the Automator LLC.

Adam Bertram is an automation engineer, blogger, independent consultant, freelance writer, author, trainer, and presenter. Adam focuses on DevOps, system management, and automation technologies as well as various cloud platforms. He is a Microsoft Cloud and Datacenter Management MVP, a passionate learner and efficiency nerd that enjoys teaching others a better way to leverage automation. You can find Adam at his adamtheautomator.com blog, LinkedIn or on Twitter at @adbertram.

Adam Bertram is also a PowerShell guru and Microsoft MVP. When it comes to PowerShell and using it’s powers to automate tasks in IT, Adam is an encyclopedia on the subject.

The idea of today’s episode is to cover questions such as:

  • What exactly do we mean when we say Infrastructure as Code (IaC)? How does this tie into Infrastructure as a Service?
  • So the big problem that Infrastructure as Code solves for has everything to do with scaling and automation is the means to an end when it comes to this concept of IaC?
  • Would you say that IaC gave birth to the idea of DevOps? I mean you’re essentially developing and infrastructure to scale, so it brings a coding dynamic to the IT field.
  • Why would you use PowerShell as opposed to more popular languages used in IaC, such as Ansible or Ruby on Rails?

PowerShell, what and why?

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In Today’s PICNIC episode, our host Greg Mooney welcomes Adam Bertram and his guests Jeffrey Hicks and Michael Greene. We'll be having a discussion, in a roundtable format, on the "whats" and "whys" of this popular scripting language.

A little bit about our guests:

Adam Bertram is Chief Automator at Adam the Automator LLC. He is an automation engineer, blogger, independent consultant, freelance writer, author, trainer, and presenter. Adam focuses on DevOps, system management, and automation technologies as well as various cloud platforms. He is a Microsoft Cloud and Datacenter Management MVP, a passionate learner and efficiency nerd that enjoys teaching others a better way to leverage automation. You can find Adam at is adamtheautomator.com blog, LinkedIn or on Twitter at @adbertram.

Jeffery Hicks is an IT veteran with over 25 years of experience, much of it spent as an IT infrastructure consultant specializing in Microsoft server technologies with an emphasis in automation and efficiency. He is a multi-year recipient of the Microsoft MVP Award. He works today as an independent author, teacher and consultant. Jeff has taught and presented on PowerShell and the benefits of automation to IT Pros worldwide. Jeff has authored and co-authored a number of books, writes for numerous online sites and print publications, is a contributing editor at Petri.com, a Pluralsight author, and a frequent speaker at technology conferences and user groups.

Michael Greene is a Principal Program Manager at Microsoft and is lead program manager for the Desired State Configuration (DSC) product. Michael is also co-lead for Azure DSC, and community manager for Azure Security & Operations Management Services.

During today’s roundtable, our host and guests will cover questions every IT pro has:

  • Top three reasons to why someone would want to learn PowerShell
  • The biggest blocker that prevents more people from using PowerShell
  • The most rewarding story heard from an IT professional that had adopted PowerShell
  • Microsoft action plan to work with the community